Best answer: Which best defines the term environmental determinism?

“Environmental determinism” is a theory of cultural geography that states that cultural traditions, and the differences between various cultures, are informed by environmental concerns. This had racial connotations during the age of European colonialism. … This was used as an academic support for European colonialism.

Which of the following best describes environmental determinism?

1. Which of the following BEST describes environmental determinism? It is the belief that the physical environment affects social and cultural development. It is the belief that the physical environment affects our biology.

What is meant by environmental determinism?

Environmental determinism is the doctrine that human growth, development and activities are controlled by the physical environment (Lethwaite, 1966). Hence, factors of culture, race and intelligence are supposed to derive from the benign or malign influences of climate, and other aspects of human habitat.

What does environmental determinism mean quizlet?

Environmental Determinism. Belief that natural factors controls the development of human qualities (theory that nature controls the way people do stuff) Environmental Possibilism.

What is environmental determinism example?

As an example, those who believe in environmental determinism believe that the continuously warm weather of subtropical regions leads to underdeveloped, more tribal societies. … The idea being, that if a culture is isolated, its society and culture will inherently adopt cultural traits that are unique only to them.

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What is the meaning of environmental determinism Class 12?

The concept of environmental determinism explains that human is a passive agent, influenced by the environmental factors that are physical factors like climate, flora, fauna, etc which determine the attitude of decision-making and lifestyle of human beings.

What is environmental determinism and Possibilism in geography?

Environmental Determinism is theory that environment causes social development or the idea that natural environment influences people. Possibilism is theory that people can adjust or overcome an environment.

What is determinism in geography?

Geographical determinism asserts that human history, culture, society and lifestyles, development, etc are shaped by their physical environment. Geographical determinism understands human social action as a response to the natural environment.

What is environmental determinism used for?

The doctrine of environmental determinism has, for more than two millennia, been used to explain the social organization and physical characteristics of populations. Classical scholars deployed humorism to define a causal relationship between environment and temperament, physiognomy, and intelligence.

What is environmental geography?

Environmental geography focuses on the physical environment and its effect on humans. Understanding the integration of physical and environmental geography has never been more important than it is today to address the environmental challenges facing the world.

What is environmental determinism APHG?

Environmental determinism is the theory that the environment determines, plays a decisive role, or causes social and cultural development. “A region’s culture can be affected” is not as strong a characterization as a theory of determinism requires, and is in fact the theory of environmental possibilism.

What is the difference between environmental determinism and Possibilism quizlet?

Environmental Determinism is theory that environment causes social development or the idea that natural environment influences people. Possibilism is theory that people can adjust or overcome an environment.

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Who developed environmental determinism?

Environmental determinism went beyond these early forms of probablism and imposed a yet greater rigidity upon human development. The father of the paradigm (and some would say of geography itself, Holt-Jensen, 1988, p. 31) was the German geographer–anthropologist Friedrich Ratzel (1844–1904).